BLADEOFSTEEL  /  NHL  /  NEWS
Isreal Mianscum of the Sherbrooke Phoenix during practice
Photo credit: CBC

Top prospect claims he turned down multiple pro deals, explains why

Published March 17, 2024 at 10:21
BY

The game of hockey is far reaching and is played by millions of people the world over from numerous diverse backgrounds. Even in Canada, you can see that the individuals who play the game are part of the most multicultural parts of today's society, which brings news today.

While there is little and far between indigenous representation in hockey and the National Hockey League, it has exploded into what it is today. Recently, it was reported that Israel Mianscum, who belongs to the Cree First Nation, has decided to forgo the opportunity to sign a contract with the New Jersey Devils. His agent has suggested that Mianscum was offered an opportunity for a two-way contract in the American Hockey League and the East Coast Hockey League, but he wanted to go in a different direction and was aiming to sign a National Hockey League Entry Level contract.


These sorts of scenarios aren't uncommon, and the player is well within his right to determine where he wants to play, but one has to wonder whether, in 2024, allowing a player to dictate where he wants to go is too far. On the one hand, he needs to be in a place where he feels like he can contribute and remain of sound mind, he shouldn't be able to call the shots all the time.


Fans may see this sort of thing continue to play out year after year, largely in part due to the fact that players continue to fight for more rights while playing a game, albeit for a living. Whatever happens to Mianscum, must be the right decision for him and his family. One has to believe he'll get an opportunity somewhere, even if just for a cup of coffee.
POLL
March 17   |   271 answers
Top prospect claims he turned down multiple pro deals, explains why

Do young players have too much power so to where they want to play when turning pro?

Yes20073.8 %
No7126.2 %
LIST OF POLL
Latest 10 stories